Dan J. Martin

College of Fine Arts

Stanley and Marcia Gumberg Dean, College of Fine Arts; Professor of Arts and Entertainment Management, School of Drama

Dan J. Martin

College of Fine Arts

Stanley and Marcia Gumberg Dean, College of Fine Arts; Professor of Arts and Entertainment Management, School of Drama

 

Prior to his appointment as Dean of Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts, Dan most recently served as director of the Institute for the Management of Creative Enterprises (IMCE), a collaborative initiative of the College of Fine Arts and the H. John Heinz III College. The program provides professional graduate-level management training for the culture and entertainment industries through its Master of Arts Management (MAM) and Master of Entertainment Industry Management (MEIM) programs, as well as applied research and support services through the Arts Management and Technology Lab (AMT Lab), a service devoted to the exploration of computer and information technology in the arts management process.   

Dan’s vision and effort built the graduate programs into they are today. He joined the Carnegie Mellon faculty in 1992 to direct the MAM Program. In the mid- ‘90s, as Internet technology was just emerging beyond the academic community, Dan founded the Center for Arts Management and Technology (AMT Lab’s predecessor).  In 2004, he established the MEIM Program, an innovative academic program that includes a year of educational and practical work in Los Angeles, to serve the management education needs of the screen-based creative industries.

Dan has consulted with cultural organizations in strategic planning, information technology, not-for-profit governance and finance management. He has presented workshops and master classes in arts management, organizational structure, information technology, board development and other topics at universities and for arts service organizations in the United States, Canada, Germany, Spain, Austria, Greece and Italy.

Dan also is on the faculty of the Management and Development of Cultural and Artistic Organizations (GIOCA) Program in the School of Economics at the University of Bologna (Italy) and he serves on the advisory board of the Fitzcarraldo Foundation, an arts management training and consulting center in Turin, Italy. Dan served on the faculty of the European Summer Academy for Cultural Management in Salzburg, Austria, and on the advisory or steering committees of several professional and research institutions, including the Center for Arts and Culture and Americans for the Arts.

Dan has authored a number of reports, magazine articles and journal articles on arts management and related issues and is co-author, with Francois Colbert of HEC/Montreal, of Marketing Planning for Culture and the Arts: Fundamental Principles and Practices for Building an Effective Marketing Campaign, published in fall 2008.

Prior to joining the academic community in 1989 as director of the Arts Management Program at The University of Akron, Ohio, Dan spent 14 years in not-for-profit professional and educational theatre administration: Managing Director of CSC Repertory (New York City), Managing Director of Virginia Stage Company (Norfolk), Marketing Director of the Walnut Street Theatre Company (Philadelphia), and Marketing Director/Ticket Office Manager of the University Theatre, Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo). Dan also has spent several years with summer-theatre operations in Michigan, New Hampshire and Minnesota. While in New York City, Dan worked in the Theatre Program Office of FEDAPT (Foundation for the Extension and Development of the American Professional Theatre) and with the Richard Morse Mime Theatre. During the summers of 1994 and 1995, Dan served as associate producer of Carnegie Mellon Drama's Showcase of New Plays. 

Dan earned his master of fine arts (MFA) in performing arts management at City University of New York under the late Stephen Langley, prominent arts management scholar and practitioner, and considered the “founding dean” of arts management. He earned his undergraduate degree in theatre from Western Michigan University.

Eric Anderson

College of Fine Arts

Associate Professor & Senior Associate Dean of the College of Fine Arts

Eric Anderson

College of Fine Arts

Associate Professor & Senior Associate Dean of the College of Fine Arts

Office: Margaret Morrison 201A
Website: View

 

Eric Anderson is the Associate Dean of the College of Fine Arts and an associate professor of industrial design at the School of Design. He teaches undergraduate design studio courses, and, with faculty from CMU’s Mechanical Engineering and Tepper School of Business, he co-teaches the award winning Integrated Product Develop (IPD) capstone course in the Master in Product Development program. The IPD course focuses on team-based integrated product development among engineering, business, and design disciplines. 

Anderson also serves as the Chairman of the Industrial Designers Society of America’s (IDSA) national Board of Directors. 

His research interests include interdisciplinary integrated product development, visualization within the context of design, and the emergence of “visual intelligence,” the skill that allows designers to reason with complex information using varied tools and methods in order to shape environmental and behavioral conditions.

Kristen Letts Kovak

College of Fine Arts

Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs & Assistant Teaching Professor, College of Fine Arts

Kristen Letts Kovak

College of Fine Arts

Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs & Assistant Teaching Professor, College of Fine Arts

Office: CFA 100
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Kristen Letts Kovak is the Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs and an Assistant Teaching Professor in the College of Fine Arts. She teaches undergraduate courses on drawing, painting, and aesthetic philosophy, including the intra-collegiate seminar, “Passport to the Arts.”

Her artworks investigate connections between visual, perceptual and cognitive patterning. Kovak uses surface articulations to explore the interplay of representation and abstraction-- estranging the familiar and naturalizing the non-objective.  “The complexity push[es] against the boundary where comprehensible becomes confusion.  It remind[s] me of swimming in the ocean, where the destructive power of the water is always present in your mind, even when you feel capable of making it back to shore.”- Eric Lidji

Her works have been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout the country. Most recently, she has had solo exhibitions at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, St. Michael's College, Ohio University, Penn State, Baum School of Art, and the Arts Club of Washington.  Her paintings and drawings have been featured in group exhibitions at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Williamsburg Art and Historical Center, Wildling Art Museum, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, IUPUI, Muskegon Museum of Art, Museum of the Red River, and the Woodson Art Museum.

Kovak’s curatorial projects examine common psychological, aesthetic and intellectual questions underlying seemingly diverse artistic practices.  Her recent projects at SPACE gallery (“Cataloguing Pattern,” “Degrees of Separation,” and “Identity Play”) share a characteristic interest in balancing opposing forces to arrive at harmonious states of disequilibrium. 

Her pedagogical research includes cross-disciplinary thinking, representation, color theory and aesthetic philosophy.  She was awarded a Wimmer Faculty Fellowship from Carnegie Mellon’s Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation to study research-based methods in teaching creative risk-taking.

Carolyn Hess Abraham

College of Fine Arts

Associate Dean, Advancement

Carolyn Hess Abraham

College of Fine Arts

Associate Dean, Advancement

Office: CFA 106

Carolyn Hess Abraham is the associate dean for Advancement in Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts (CFA). Hess Abraham serves as a senior member of the CFA management team and leads and manages the direction, planning and execution of fundraising and alumni relations activities for the college. She is responsible for creating and implementing a comprehensive fundraising and alumni relations strategy for CFA, working with the college’s current team to maximize advancement efforts among various audiences.

 

A 26-year employee of Carnegie Mellon, Hess Abraham joined CFA in November 2016 from the Tepper School of Business, where she served as executive director of Corporate and Foundation Relations. Hess Abraham has extensive experience in personal, corporate and foundation fundraising programs, including philanthropy, research support and experiential learning student projects.

 

She earned her undergraduate degree from Brown University in economics and international relations, and her MBA from the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. She has served as an adjunct professor of business administration at the Tepper School and as a lecturer at the University of Pittsburgh Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business. She is an active volunteer/board member in several Pittsburgh civic organizations and brings a lifelong enthusiasm and support of the arts to CFA.

Patti Pavlus

College of Fine Arts

Associate Dean for Finance and Operations

Patti Pavlus

College of Fine Arts

Associate Dean for Finance and Operations

Office: CFA 100
Website: View

 

Patti Pavlus holds a bachelor’s degree from Chatham University, Pittsburgh.  She has been a staff member in the College of Fine Arts since 1983, beginning as Assistant Director of the Music Preparatory School program, and then in various positions within the Dean’s Office.

Patti has served in her current position of Assistant Dean for Business Affairs since 1993. In this position she oversees the financial and administrative functions of the college, including budgeting, payroll, human resources, and facilities management.  She also coordinates the faculty promotion and tenure process.

Liz Fox

College of Fine Arts

Assistant Dean for Research

Liz Fox

College of Fine Arts

Assistant Dean for Research

Office: CFA 104
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Liz Fox is the Assistant Dean for Research in the College of Fine Arts. Through the Dean’s Office, Liz provides comprehensive support to Fine Arts faculty, staff and students in the administration of sponsored research, including pre- and post-award administration.

She has been with the university for more than 30 years and served in several positions prior to joining the Dean’s Office. Liz was first part of the Provost’s Office and then moved to the School of Architecture, becoming a technical writer for the precursor to the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics. That role led to her becoming research administrator for the School of Architecture.

Ultimately, Liz saw her duties expanded to include the other CFA schools and centers, including the Remaking Cities Institute, the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the Miller Gallery. A graduate of the Pennsylvania State University, Liz has been a Certified Research Administrator for more than 10 years.

Stephen R. Lee

School of Architecture

Head of School & Professor

Stephen R. Lee

School of Architecture

Head of School & Professor

Office: CFA 201
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Stephen Lee was appointed in July 2009 to a five-year term as Head of the School of Architecture and is the track chair of the CMU Master of Science in Sustainable Design degree. Professor Lee graduated from Carnegie Mellon’s School of Architecture in 1975 with a Bachelor of Architecture and in 1977 with a Master of Architecture and Advanced Building Systems. He has been a professor at Carnegie Mellon since 1981.

Professor Lee’s practice and teaching focuses on issues of systems integration, material innovation, renewable energy and the integrated design process for high performance commercial and residential architecture. He is a LEED accredited professional and provides sustainable design consulting services for institutional and commercial clients in Europe, Asia, Canada and the United States. Innovative sustainable projects on which Professor Lee has been involved include the Armstrong World Industries Susquehanna House (Lancaster, PA), the Jean Canfield Government of Canada Building (Charlottetown, PEI), the PA Department of Environmental Protection South Central Office Building (Harrisburg, PA), Alcoa Fjardaal Smelter (Reydarfjordur, Iceland), Pittsburgh Green Innovators, International Union of Operating Engineer’s Training Facility and Phipps Conservatory (Pittsburgh, PA) and the Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace, Stever House, Henderson House, the CIC Building and the Gates Center (Carnegie Mellon Campus).

His consulting work with the PA Department of Environmental Protection resulted in a new standard for healthy, flexible, adaptable and energy and environmentally effective buildings in the Commonwealth. Professor Lee has developed and conducted professional enrichment curricula for the PA Departments of General Services and Environmental Protection and the federal General Services Administration.

Professor Lee has been the faculty adviser for the CMU School of Architecture’s Solar Decathlon teams (2002, 2005 & 2007) and his teaching activities have resulted in the integration of undergraduate courses related to design, environment, materials, structures and construction.

Charlie White

School of Art

Head of School & Professor

Charlie White

School of Art

Head of School & Professor

Office: CFA 301
Website: View

Charlie White, who succeeds John Carson as Head of the School of Art, is an artist and academic whose work pushes the boundaries of representation in varied genres. His career has encompassed photography, film, animation, public events, popular entertainment and documentary archives. White has more than 20 years of experience as an internationally exhibiting artist, with 14 years in academia, bridging the worlds of art making, pedagogy and school administration.

Before coming to CMU, White was a professor in USC’s Roski School of Art and Design, where he established and was area head of a technology-rich program in digital imaging, video and media theory, which thrived across the school’s undergraduate curriculum. As director of the school’s Master of Fine Arts program from 2007 through 2011, he worked with exceptional artists and teachers, including Sharon Lockhart, Frances Stark, Andrea Zittel and A.L. Steiner, to form one of the most progressive young graduate programs in the United States.

White’s work has been discussed and reviewed in periodicals and journals such as The New York Times, Artforum, Frieze, Flash Art, Modern Painters, The New Yorker, Wired, Lacanian ink, and EXIT Image and Culture. In addition, his works have been included in two Thames and Hudson surveys, The Photograph As Contemporary Art, by Charlotte Cotton, and The Body in Contemporary Art, by Sally O’Reilly, amongst other surveys on contemporary photography and art.

In addition to his studio practice, White has written about contemporary topics related to photography and popular representation, and he has produced numerous public and non-institutional projects, including a collaborative teen pop album and the founding and editorship of “The Enemy,” a critical and cultural journal featuring essays and projects by artists, academics and activists. White’s most recent monographs include Such Appetite, Little Brown Mushroom, 2013, and American MinorJPR | Ringier, 2009. His most recent project, Music For Sleeping Children, is an experimental pop album focusing on the lives of adolescent girls.

White’s work as been exhibited at institutions around the world, including solo exhibitions at the Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York; FA Projects, London; Loock Gallery, Berlin; Brandstrom Gallery, Stockholm; and LAXART, Los Angeles. Solo institutional exhibitions include the Los Angeles County Museum; Domus Artium in Salamanca, Spain; Oslo Kunstforening in Oslo, Norway; and the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, in Ridgefield, CT.

White’s work has also been included in numerous group exhibitions such as Spectator Sports, curated by Allison Grant at the Museum for Contemporary Photography, Chicago, 2013; the 2011 Singapore Biennial; Nine Lives, curated by Ali Subotnik at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, 2009; The Puppet Show, curated by Ingrid Schafnner and Carin Kuoni for the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, 2008; Art in America Now, organized by the Guggenheim Museum for the Shanghai Museum of Contemporary Art in China, 2007; and Sympathy For The Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967, curated by Dominic Molon for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 2007. In addition to his exhibition history, White has had six monographs of his work published, and his films have screened at the Sundance Film Festival and Director’s Fortnight at Cannes.

White was a fellow at the Yale Norfolk Summer Program in 1994, received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in 1995, and his MFA in 1998 from Art Center College of Design.

http://charliewhite.info

 

Terry Irwin

School of Design

Head of School & Professor

Terry Irwin

School of Design

Head of School & Professor

 

Terry Irwin is Head of the School of Design. She is interested in design for sustainability, and her research explores how living systems principles can inform traditional design process.

Irwin sees design as playing an important role in the transition to a sustainable society. Her areas of research interest focus on worldview as the basis for design for sustainability, and examines the aspects of an ecological worldview for designers. It also explores the Goethean method as a qualitative way of knowing that can inform traditional design process. She has been teaching sustainable design, holistic science, typography, systems and communication design, drawing, corporate identity and branding, and information and interaction design at the undergraduate and graduate levels. She has lectured widely on various important design topics, and is a member of the American Institute of Graphic Artists (AIGA), on whose national board of directors she served from 2001 – 2004.

Peter Cooke

School of Drama

Head of School & Professor

Peter Cooke

School of Drama

Head of School & Professor

Office: Head
Website: View

 

Peter Cooke is one of Australia’s leading performing arts educationalists, administrators, researchers and theatre practitioners. Born in Brisbane and educated in Kuala Lumpur, Canberra and Sydney Peter was the first graduate of the Theatre Design Course at Australia’s premiere theatre school, the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA).

Prior to joining Carnegie Mellon’s School of Drama in January 2009 Peter was the Deputy Director and Head of Design at NIDA, a role he held for 22 years. Over three decades he has designed some 150 productions across the disciplines of drama, opera, dance, puppetry, music theatre and large scale events. Peter’s past students at NIDA have gone on to win numerous accolades for their contributions to local, national and international stages and screens including three Academy Awards to Catherine Martin [Moulin Rouge - Production Design] and Angus Strathie [Moulin Rouge - Costume Design].

In 1990 Peter was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to audit and review theatre training pedagogy and practice in several major drama schools across Europe and the USA.

In 1996-97 Peter spent an academic year at the Yale School of Drama as a Special Research Fellow, auditing the Directing, Producing, Design and Playwriting Courses. He subsequently published a book on his time spent with Yale’s eminent design teacher, Professor Ming Cho Lee: Yale School of Drama - Theatre Design Training: Nairnpress 1999.

In 1996 Peter led the design team responsible for the Handover Ceremony at the Closing Ceremony of the Atlanta Summer Olympic Games. His inclusion of NIDA student designers in the Atlanta team led to many being commissioned to design for the Ceremonies of the Sydney Summer Olympic Games in 2000.

Peter completed his doctorate at the University of New South Wales - researching the notion of ‘Australianness’ in the output of the London-based and Tasmanian-born theatre designer, Loudon Sainthill 1919-1969.

A Visiting Professor at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, Peter has taught and lectured extensively throughout Southeast Asia for many years, including teaching and designing productions at the National School of Drama in New Delhi, India.

Peter was awarded an Order of Australia, OAM, in the Queen’s Birthday Honors list in 2008 for ‘Service to the performing arts through theatrical design education, research and administration.’

Denis Colwell

School of Music

Head of School & Associate Professor

Denis Colwell

School of Music

Head of School & Associate Professor

Office: CFA 105



Currently Head of the Carnegie Mellon School of Music, Denis Colwell served as Assistant Head of the School from 1988 to 1995, and has served on its faculty since 1993.

Colwell was Music Director of the Carnegie Mellon Wind Ensemble from 1993 to 2011, and his 1996 recording with that group was hailed as "…one of the best band recordings in recent years…" by the American Record Guide (March/April 1996). 

From 1994 to 2009 Colwell served as Music Director of the River City Brass Band and performed over 1,400 concerts with that ensemble throughout the USA. He joined the group as a cornetist in 1982, and was ultimately  promoted to Assistant Principal Solo Cornet. In 1991 he was named Associate Conductor of the River City Brass Band by its founder and first music director Robert Bernat. Colwell assumed all conducting duties in May 1994, and the responsibilities of music director were added six months later. 

Colwell studied trumpet performance both as an undergraduate and graduate student with the legendary Anthony L. Pasquarelli at Carnegie Mellon. Colwell was founder of the Carnegie Mellon Youth Brass Band and the River City Youth Brass Band, and served as conductor of both ensembles. 

M. Stephanie Murray

BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

Director & Academic Advisor, Assistant Teaching Professor

M. Stephanie Murray

BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

Director & Academic Advisor, Assistant Teaching Professor

Office: Solar Decathlon House
Website: View

 

M. Stephanie Murray can: teach you critical theory in three minutes; draw very charming cats on a blackboard; whip your resume into shape; offer candy; advise your Capstone Project. She can also help you see the practical application of the skills you develop as a BXA student and can remind you why failure is an important research method.

How can she do such an astonishing array of things? Because she has a background in teaching courses on gender and culture in Early Modern English literature, as well as introductions to cultural studies and literary theory. She’s also worked as a graduate liaison between undergraduate English majors and career placement resources. And she has experience working with interdisciplinary graduate students in planning degree curricula and advising masters’ theses. The cat drawings just come naturally.

In her spare time, Dr. Murray thinks a lot about revenge tragedy. She did her doctoral work at the University of Chicago, focusing on Early Modern English drama. Her dissertation, “Dead Reckoning: Knowing and Telling in Early Modern Revenge Tragedy and History Plays,” investigates strategies of epistemology and narrative in plays by Kyd, Marlowe, and Shakespeare. Her recent work has extended this research into thinking about the specialized technical languages of the Early Modern period and how they turn up in literature, with conference presentations on feminine performances of sprezzatura and the language of legal motive in Shakespeare’s poetry.

Dr. Murray teaches the BXA Freshman Research Seminar (52-190) for incoming BXA freshmen, focusing on modes of representation across modes, adaptation of media, and remix culture. This involves a lot of theory, literature, and YouTube videos. She also teaches the BXA Capstone Seminar (52-401) which guides BXA seniors through how to organize their research for their senior projects. This involves more theory, lots of documentation tools, and a tiny bit of YouTube videos.

Kathryn Heidemann

Arts & Entertainment Management

Assistant Dean for Arts and Entertainment Programs

Kathryn Heidemann

Arts & Entertainment Management

Assistant Dean for Arts and Entertainment Programs

Office: HBH 1105A
Website: View

 

Kathryn Heidemann is a senior arts management professional with 15 years of field experience in arts programming, marketing, education, festival operations, nonprofit management and fundraising. She oversees the arts management curriculum and its faculty, spearheads the MAM program team and its agenda (marketing, alumni relations, career services, admissions), cultivates strategic partnerships with the local, national and international arts community, and advises Technology in the Arts, a research initiative exploring best practices in arts management and technology. She also leads the dual degree partnership with the University of Bologna’s Graduate Degree in Innovation and Organization of Culture and the Arts (GIOCA) program in Italy.

Kathryn holds a Master of Arts Management (MAM) degree from Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz School of Public Policy and Management/College of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia College Chicago, where she studied dance and performing arts management. She also attended the University of Michigan’s Residential College and is a graduate of Leadership Pittsburgh’s Leadership Development Initiative, the Association of Performing Arts Presenters’ Emerging Leadership Institute, and the Coro Center for Civic Leadership’s Women in Leadership program.

Daniel Green

Arts & Entertainment

Program Director, Master of Entertainment Industry Management

Daniel Green

Arts & Entertainment

Program Director, Master of Entertainment Industry Management

Office: LAC
Website: View


Dan has worked in TV production on several programs including “ER,” “The Sopranos,” “Party of Five,” “Time of Your Life,” “Fantasy Island,” “The Adventures of Brisco County Jr.,” “She TV” and “The West Wing.” Most recently, Dan directed the pilot “Munhall” starring George Wendt (Cheers) and Tom Atkins (Law and Order). Dan directed and produced the film, “Entropy,” which toured the country on the festival circuit. His film, “Listen,” a documentary about inner city teens was marketed as a teaching tool in classrooms throughout the United States.

As a writer, Dan's produced work features the film, “Listen.” He also wrote and directed several commercials and PSAs. Other writing work includes Canterbury Air at Los Angeles City College and Brethren Christian High School, Long Beach, Calif.; Crew Hours at Los Angeles City College and An Elf Chorus Line for “In The Spotlight Studio” in New Jersey. He also directed a staged reading of his script, “The Rules of a Muslim In Love,” in Los Angeles. As a casting Director, Dan cast “The Kennedy Mystique: Creating Camelot” for National Geographic Channel. He also cast Nixon In China, 72’ for Central Chinese Television (CCTV), Beijing, China.

He received his MFA in directing from Carnegie Mellon University, his BA in acting/ directing from Southern Illinois University and is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in higher education and organizational leadership at Azusa Pacific University. He is a graduate of The Second City and the Players Workshop of Second City, both located in Chicago.

Dan is a member of The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and The Association of Arts Administration Educators. He is the past president of Carnegie Mellon’s West Coast Drama Alumni Clan and the past president of the Carnegie Mellon National Alumni Association Board. He was also honored with an Alumni Service Award from the University for his many years of support. In 2005, he delivered the keynote commencement address at Carnegie Mellon University titled, “An Arbitrary Time.”

Golan Levin

Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry

Director, Associate Professor of Art

Golan Levin

Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry

Director, Associate Professor of Art

Office: CFA 111
Website: View


Golan Levin is Associate Professor of Computation Arts at Carnegie Mellon University. Appointed in the School of Art, he also holds appointments by courtesy in the School of Computer Science, the School of Design, and the Entertainment Technology Center. Since 2009, Levin has also served as Director of CMU's Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, a laboratory for atypical and anti-disciplinary research across the arts, science, technology and culture. A two-time TED speaker and recipient of undergraduate and graduate degrees from the MIT Media Laboratory, Levin was named one of "50 Designers Shaping the Future" by Fast Company magazine in October 2012. He has exhibited widely in Europe, America and Asia.

Levin's research explores new intersections of machine code and visual culture, combining equal measures of the whimsical, the provocative, and the sublime in a wide variety of media. His work has spanned themes such as gestural robotics; the tactical potential of personal digital fabrication; novel aesthetics of non-verbal interactivity; and information visualization as a mode of arts practice. Through performances, digital artifacts, and virtual environments, often created with a variety of collaborators, Levin applies creative twists to digital technologies that highlight our relationship with machines, make visible our ways of interacting with each other, and explore the intersection of abstract communication and interactivity.

As an educator, Levin's pedagogy is concerned with reclaiming computation as a medium of personal expression. He teaches “studio art courses in computer science,” on themes like interactive art, generative form, digital fabrication, information visualization, and audiovisual performance. Levin has spent half his life as an artist embedded within technological research environments, in places like the MIT Media Laboratory, the Ars Electronica Futurelab, Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York City, and the former Interval Research Corporation in Palo Alto.